Incredible Edibles

Incredible Edible Westmount is an initiative of the Westmount Horticultural Advisory Committee in partnership with the City’s Public Works Department. The programme was inspired by Incredible Edible Todmorden, an urban agriculture initiative in the UK that began in 2008 and has spread around the world.

Since 2011, The City of Westmount has incorporated edible plants into a number of its flower beds and street planters each summer. It also offers herb and vegetable seedlings alongside flowers each spring at Westmount’s Perennial Plant Exchange. In addition, the Westmount Public Library now features a seed library which allows members to ‘borrow’ seeds in the spring, grow out the plants and and make contributions of seeds in the fall. . The presence of edible plants in our public spaces helps increase awareness about food security, prompts gardeners to grow food at home and encourages the local urban food movement. In addition, many vegetables and fruits have wonderful ornamental qualities that bring a unique beauty to flower beds.

Westmount has planted thousands of edible plants throughout the City, including more than 400 around City Hall. Anyone is welcome to pick small quantities of the plants for their own consuption, providing the plants are not removed and the appearance of the plant beds are preserved.

LOCATION OF EDIBLE PLANTS IN PUBLIC GREEN SPACES IN 2018

DESCRIPTIONS OF PLANT VARIETIES USED IN 2018

Musa

Description
This fruit – botanically a berry – produced by several kinds of large flowering plants in the genus Musa. In some countries, bananas used for cooking may be called “plantains”, distinguishing them from dessert bananas. Banana plants can be grown indoors, or outdoors in tropical climates. In Canada, bananas can be brought outside for the summer months for decoration but will most likely not produce fruit due to our short summers.

Nutrients
Bananas provide a variety of vitamins and minerals including Vitamin B6, Manganese, Vitamin C, Potassium, Dietary Fiber, Protein and Folate.

How to select
Bananas are ready when they turn yellow or brown. The more brown the banana, the more sugars are present.

When and how to pick
The bananas in Westmount are kept inside in the winters and are brought outside for the summer months. In their natural climate, banana trees enjoy a lot of sun and heat, which helps them produce fruit. Due to our short summer, it is unlikely, but not impossible, that the bananas planted in Westmount will produce fruit. If you are fortunate enough to spot some bananas, you should wait until it is at least a few inches long before picking them. If firm and light yellow, they will ripen on a windowsill.

Preparation
Bananas are excellent raw, dehydrated, cooked in baking as well as blended into smoothies or ‘nice’ cream (banana sorbet).

Recipe

EASY BANANA BREAD

Ingredients

    • 3 ripe bananas, mashed
    • 1 cup white sugar
    • 1 egg
    • 1/4 cup melted butter
    • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 tsp. baking soda
    • 1 tsp. salt

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 °F (165 °C). Grease a 9” x 5” loaf pan.
  2. Combine bananas, sugar, egg, and butter together in a bowl. Mix flour and baking soda together in a separate bowl; stir into banana mixture until batter is just mixed. Stir salt into batter. Pour batter into the prepared loaf pan.
  3. Drizzle beets with olive oil and cover with the remaining foil.
  4. Bake in the preheated oven until a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean, about 1 hour.

Source

allrecipes.com

Beta vulgaris var. cicla ‘Bali’

Description
Swiss Chard ‘Bali’ is a leafy green with red stems and veins. The plant is delicious to eat and adds a vibrant and colourful presence to a plant bed.

Nutrients
Swiss chard is antioxidant-rich and is full of beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin C. It is also a good source of fibre, vitamin K and iron.

How to select
Select stems which are firm and greens which are vibrant.

When and how to pick
During the spring and summer months, please pick a maximum of 10% of the stems and leaves. Make a clean cut with scissors or a sharp knife to assure the plant will survive the season and keep our plant beds beautiful. Pick the outer leaves first so the plant will continue to produce new inner leaves.

In late September through October, the swiss chard will be fully mature and can be removed entirely at the base with a sharp knife.

Preparation
Swiss chard is best harvested young for salads. Older leaves are best sautéed or cooked in soups. Refrigerate unwashed leaves in a lightly damp paper towel slipped into a very loosely closed plastic bag. Leaves store for up to 14 days.

Recipe

VEGAN BALI GARDEN STEW

Serves 4.
Notes:
You can easily add chicken, diced tofu or chickpeas if you’d like a little extra protein in this stew. Have all of your ingredients chopped and ready to go once you have the stove turned on. This dish goes well with rice.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup + 2 tsp coconut oil
  • 1-2 cayenne chillies, seeded + minced
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4 tsp tamari soy sauce
  • 4 cups water
  • 3 medium carrots, peeled + thinly sliced
  • 2 medium (or 4 small) tomatoes, diced
  • 1 small eggplant, chopped
  • kernels from 2 cobs of corn (1 1/3 cups)
  • 1 1/3 cups sliced green beans
  • 1 cup raw cashews
  • 4 shallots, thinly sliced
  • 4 cups chopped swiss chard (including stems)
  • salt + pepper

Preparation

  1. Heat a 1/4 cup of the coconut oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add the chili, onion and garlic. Cook until very fragrant and onion has softened slightly, about 2 minutes.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the black beans, corn, pepper, tomatoes, red onion, and pepper. Cook until just heated through (about 5-8 minutes).
  3. Add the tamari and water to the pot. Bring to a boil and then add the carrots. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 3 minutes.
  4. Add the tomatoes and eggplant and cook for a minute. Add the corn and green beans and cook for another couple minutes. At this point you can turn the heat off until you’re ready to serve it because you’ll just need to bring the pot to a boil for the greens.
  5. In a small sauté pan, heat a teaspoon of coconut oil over medium low heat. Add the raw cashews to the pan and toast them in the oil until they brown a bit on all sides, about 4-5 minutes. Empty the cashews onto a small plate and give them a little sprinkle of salt if you like.
  6. Return the small sauté pan to the heat and add the remaining teaspoon of coconut oil. Add the thinly sliced shallots to the pan and stir them around here and there until they turn deep brown and a bit crisp in some areas, about 15 minutes. Set aside..
  7. Bring the pot of stew to a boil again and add the chopped swiss chard. Cook until the greens wilt a little bot, about 1 minute. Serve the stew hot with the toasty cashews and shallots on top.

Source

Source : Erin Scott’s Yummy Supper
thefirstmess.com

Beta vulgaris var. cicla ‘Bright Lights’

Description
‘Bright Lights’ Swiss Chard is a stunning chard mix whose stems are bright gold, pink and crimson. A few plants will be white and pink striped, orange, scarlet, purple or green. All are delicious to eat and add vibrant colour to a plant bed.

Nutrients
Swiss chard is antioxidant-rich and is full of beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin C. It is also a good source of fibre, vitamin K and iron.

How to select
Select stems which are firm and greens which are vibrant.

When and how to pick
During the spring and summer months, please pick a maximum of 10% of the stems and leaves. Make a clean cut with scissors or a sharp knife to assure the plant will survive the season and keep our plant beds beautiful. Pick the outer leaves first so the plant will continue to produce new inner leaves.

In late September through October, the swiss chard will be fully mature and can be removed entirely at the base with a sharp knife.

Preparation
Swiss chard is best harvested young for salads. Older leaves are best sautéed or cooked in soups. Refrigerate unwashed leaves in a lightly damp paper towel slipped into a very loosely closed plastic bag. Leaves store for up to 14 days.

Recipe

BRIGHT LIGHTS SWISS CHARD TACO WRAPS WITH CUMIN-LIME SAUCE

Ingredients

Cumin-lime sauce:

  • 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice (1 to 2 large limes)
  • 1 teaspoon lime zest
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 scallions, minced-white and light green parts only
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin + more if you like the heat
  • 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt

Wraps:

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 (15-oz can) black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 2 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
  • 1 small red onion, diced
  • 1 small bell pepper, diced
  • 3 cups cooked brown rice
  • 2 cups fresh cilantro, finely chopped
  • 12 ‘Bright lights’ Swiss chard leaves, tough stems removed

Preparation

  1. Combine all of the ingredients for the dressing in a mason jar and secure it with a lid. Shake vigorously until the dressing is well combined. You can also do this with an immersion blender or food processor. Taste test and adjust seasonings if necessary.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the black beans, corn, pepper, tomatoes, red onion, and pepper. Cook until just heated through (about 5-8 minutes).
  3. Toss in cooked rice and fresh cilantro.
  4. Toss with the dressing.
  5. Season with a little salt and stir until well combined.
  6. Scoop a healthy portion of the veggie mixture into each chard leaf and either wrap like a burrito or hold like a corn tortilla.
  7. Add a few pickled jalapeños, avocado, shredded cheese and a small dash of hot sauce, if desired.

Source

website : thekitchn.com

Beta vulgaris

Description
This heirloom beet from 1840 is primarily grown for its tender, sweet, deep red-burgundy foliage, but the beets are also tasty. Though it is edible, it is often grown as an ornamental, and its dark leaves contrast nicely with many garden plants.

Nutrients
Beets are an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C. They also contain a good amount of calcium, iron and antioxidants.

How to select
Leaves can be eaten anytime but the beet should be pulled out in the fall when the leaves reach 18 inches high and the beet is 2-3 inches in size.

When and how to pick
During the spring and summer months, please pick a maximum of 10% of the stems and leave the beets in the ground to mature. This assures that plant will survive the season and keep our plant beds beautiful.

Preparation
Beets and beet leaves can be eaten cooked or raw in salads. Beets can be baked, boiled, steamed or pickled. Beet juice is delicious when combined with other fruits and beet soup is also a popular dish, hot or cold.

Recipe

STRAWBERRY-BEET SMOOTHIE

Ingredients

    • 1/2 cup roasted beets
    • 2 cups strawberries
    • 1 cup plain whole-milk yoghurt
    • 2 tablespoons raw honey
    • 1 banana
    • 1/2 cup orange juice

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 °F (190 °C).
  2. Trim the tops and tails off the beets and cut in half.
  3. Drizzle beets with olive oil and cover with the remaining foil.
  4. Bake for about an hour or until beets are soft when pierced with a fork. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. Once cool, peel off the skins.
  5. In a storage bag combine beets and ½ cup orange juice. Store marinated beets in the fridge for up to a week.
  6. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.

Source

website: livesimply.me

Daucus carota subsp. sativus

Description
Rainbow carrots hold a wealth of nutrients. But whatever their color, all carrots are filled with fiber, minerals, and vitamins — essential for a healthy diet and good health.

Nutrients
Carrots are rich in fibre and should be part of any healthy diet. They are a good source of several vitamins and minerals, especially vitamin A (from beta-carotene), biotin, vitamin K (phylloquinone), potassium and vitamin B6.

How to select
Carrots are ready when their tops are large and bushy sticking out of the soil. Do not eat carrots with black tops as they have gone bad. All shapes and sizes of carrots are delicious, including ‘ugly’ looking ones!

When and how to pick
Carrots planted in Westmount will be ready from August to September. Simply pull the carrot out of the soil by grabbing firmly onto the green tops. Carrot tops are edible as well and can be harvested even earlier. These add great flavor to soups and dips. Just remember not to harvest more than 10% of the tops at a time so the carrot under the soil will continue to grow.

Preparation
Carrots are very versatile and can be used raw or cooked. In sweet or salty dishes. Carrots are easily hidden in any dish if they are shredded.

Recipe

SAUTEED BROWN BUTTER GARLIC RAINBOW CARROTS

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 6 à 8 rainbow carrots, sliced
  • 1/4 cup red onion, chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. In a medium sized skillet add the butter. Cook over medium heat and whisk the butter to brown. It will become frothy and start to have a nutty aroma. Then it will turn brown.
  2. Add the garlic, sliced carrots and red onion. Sauté for about 5-7 minutes until they become soft and tender. Salt and Pepper to taste.

Source

therecipecritic.com

Brassica oleracia var. capitata

Description

‘Grand Vantage’ Cabbage is very round, blue-green in colour and produces a 5-6 lb head.

Nutrients

Cabbage is a good source of soluble and insoluble fiber and antioxidants. Cabbage is low in calories and is a great source of vitamin C and K.

How to select

When selecting, choose heads that are compact and firm. They should have fresh, crispy leaves that do not contain any markings or browning, which may be an indication of worm damage. The stem should be trimmed and look fresh, not dry and cracked. Avoid precut or shredded cabbage. Once the cabbage is cut it begins to lose its vitamin C content, even if it is tightly packaged or well wrapped.

When and how to pick

Cabbages are cold weather crops. Pick cabbages in October. Cabbage heads must feel hard and solid before removing. When harvesting, use a sharp knife to cut the head off at the base of the plant, keeping a few outer leaves to protect the head until ready to cook. Cabbage should be used whiten a few days of harvesting.

Preparation

Cabbage can be used cooked or raw. When cooked, it gives off a very pungent odor. It is excellent cooked in many dishes, soups & stews, or used raw in dishes such as coleslaw. Another popular use of cabbage is to allow it to ferment to produce sauerkraut or kimchi.

Recipe

CRISPY BRAISED CHICKEN THIGHS WITH CABBAGE AND BACON

Ingredients

  • 8 chicken thighs, bone in, skin on
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 8 ounces bacon
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 pound finely shredded cabbage (about 1 medium head)
  • 2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 6 sprigs thyme
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Preparation

  1. Adjust oven rack to center position and preheat oven to 350 °F (175 °C).
  2. Season chicken generously with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a 4- to 5-quart straight-sided sauté pan over medium-high heat until shimmering.
  3. Add chicken, skin side down, and cook without moving it until well browned and crisp, about 8 minutes total, lowering heat if it starts to smoke excessively.
  4. Flip chicken and brown lightly on second side, about 3 minutes.
  5. Transfer chicken to a large plate and set aside.
  6. Add bacon to pan and cook, stirring, until lightly browned, about 3 minutes.
  7. Add onion and cook, stirring, until softened and starting to brown, about 4 minutes.
  8. Add cabbage and cook, stirring, until softened and starting to brown, about 4 minutes.
  9. Add mustard and vinegar and cook, stirring and scraping up browned bits from bottom of pan.
  10. Add chicken stock, sugar, bay leaves, and thyme sprigs and bring to a simmer.
  11. Nestle chicken back into sauté pan, leaving the skin above the liquid but submerging most of the meat. Transfer pan to oven and cook, uncovered, until chicken is totally tender and liquid has reduced by about half, about 45 minutes.
  12. Remove from oven and transfer chicken to a serving platter.
  13. Stir butter into sauté pan and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  14. Serve immediately, spooning cabbage and sauce into shallow bowls and topping with chicken.

Source

seriouseats.com

Brassica oleracia var. capitata

Description

‘‘Kosaro’ Cabbage is an improved first early red cabbage. This hybrid variety produces round, tightly wrapped 3 lb. heads with excellent colour. Very uniform producer. Suitable for the early harvesting.
‘Kosaro’ red cabbages are delicious to eat, particularly in Asian cuisine, and add vibrant colour to a plant bed.

Nutrients

Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin C and vitamin B6. It is also a very good source of manganese, dietary fiber, potassium, vitamin B1, folate and copper. Additionally, cabbage is a good source of choline, phosphorus, vitamin B2, magnesium, calcium, selenium, iron, pantothenic acid, protein and niacin.

How to select

Heads are ready when firm and when the interior is dense. Heads will split when over mature; rapid growth due to excess moisture and fertility will also cause splitting. Splitting does not make them inedible.

When and how to pick

During the spring and summer months, please pick a maximum of 10% of the outer leaves. Make a clean cut with scissors or a sharp knife to assure the plant will survive the season and keep our plant beds beautiful. Pick the outer leaves first so the plant will continue to produce new inner leaves.
In late August or September, the cabbage will be fully mature and can be removed entirely at the base with a sharp knife.

Preparation

Cabbage is best harvested young for salads. Older leaves are best sautéed, stir-fried or cooked in soups. Refrigerate unwashed leaves in a lightly damp paper towel slipped into a very loosely closed plastic bag. Leaves store for up to 14 days.

Recipe

SESAME GINGER SAUTEED CABBAGE AND CARROTS

Serves 4
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2-inch piece ginger root, minced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons sambal oelek (optional)
  • 6 cups shredded cabbage
  • 2 cups shredded carrots
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce (low sodium)
  • 4 scallions – thinly sliced (tops and bottoms)
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • black roasted sesame seeds and chopped cilantro (optional garnish)

Preparation

  1. Heat a deep skillet over medium heat and spray with cooking spray. Add ginger, garlic and sambal oelek and cook for 30 seconds to release flavors.
  2. Add shredded cabbage, carrots and salt to the pan. Saute until slightly wilted, 7-9 minutes. Add the rice vinegar, soy sauce, scallions, and sesame oil. Saute 1 additional minute. Serve warm, garnished with sesame seeds and cilantro.

Source

Well-plated by Erin
wellplated.com

Brassica oleracea var. lacinata L.

Description
An Italian heirloom of the Lacinato or “dinosaur” family. Its rich, tender leaves are dark green-blue. The leaves are not very curled but are very crinkled. They have a softer texture than curly green kale and are delicious cooked. They are also an interesting addition to a flower garden.

Nutrients
Brassica toscano is extremely nutrient rich per calorie. It boasts a large dose of Vitamins K, A and C as well as lots of magnesium, calcium and iron. Being a leafy green, it is also high in fiber.

How to select
Brassica toscano can be eaten at any stage. Look for plants with firm, richly coloured leaves.

Brassica toscano are delicious to moths and beetles also. Westmount is pesticide free so you may see small holes in the leaves. These leaves are still perfectly good to eat, just make sure you give them a wash before eating like all other vegetables and fruits.

When and how to pick
During the spring and summer months, please pick a maximum of 10% of the stems and leaves. Make a clean cut with scissors or a sharp knife to assure the plant will survive the season and keep our plant beds beautiful. Pick the outer leaves first so the plant will continue to produce new inner leaves.

In late September through October, the brassica toscano will be fully mature and can be removed entirely at the base with a knife.

Preparation
The young leaves are better suited for raw eating, while tougher mature leaves are better for steaming, frying or adding to soups. Brassica toscano is perfect for drying into ‘chips.’

Some people don’t like the bitterness, for the most part, it tastes a lot like chard or collards. A light frost will sweeten the flavour, so harvesting later in the year is ideal.

Unwashed, raw brassica toscano will keep in the refrigerator for about a week. To freeze, blanch and store in airtight plastic bags.

Recipe

TUSCAN KALE SALAD

Ingredients

  • 4-6 cups kale, loosely packed, sliced leaves of Italian black (Lacinato, “dinosaur,” cavolo nero) midribs removed.
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 3-4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, mashed
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • hot red pepper flakes to taste
  • 2/3 cup grated Pecorino Toscano cheese (Rosselino variety if you can find it) or other flavourful grating cheese such as Asiago or Parmesan
  • 1/2 cup freshly made bread crumbs from lightly toasted bread

Preparation

  1. Whisk together lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper, and a generous pinch (or more to taste) of hot red pepper flakes.
  2. Pour over kale in serving bowl and toss well.
  3. Add 2/3 of the cheese and toss again.
  4. Let kale sit for at least 5 minutes. Add bread crumbs, toss again, and top with remaining cheese.

Source

drweil.com

Brassica oleracea var. lacinata L.

Description
Black Magic Kale has a rich dark colour. Throughout the growing season, new leaves keep appearing, just like magic, providing you with a continuous harvest. The savoy leaves can be picked as a baby leaf or left to fully mature as it sweetens with frost. Excellent cold and bolt tolerance making this variety a top selection.

Nutrients
Kale is one of the healthiest vegetables on earth. Kale is a true super food rich in carontenoids and flavonids, which are two powerful antioxidants. One cup of kale has just 36 calories, zero grams of fat, a whopping 684% of RDA of K, 206% of A, and 134% of C vitamins.

How to select
Leaves can be used at any time for salads or as garnishes. Leaves are cropped, leaving the bud to grow new leaves, or the entire plant is harvested at one cutting. For a fall crop, wait until the plants are touched by a frost to sweeten the taste.

When and how to pick
Kale is ready to harvest when the leaves are about the size of your hand. Pick about one fistful of leaves per harvest, or about 10% of the size of the plant. Young kale is best for salads while older kale tastes even sweeter with a touch of frost.

Preparation
Kale can be incorporated into many dishes, both raw and cooked. You can massage it into a salad, make kale chips, pair it with nuts, throw it in soup or pasta. You can even use it in a smoothie!

Unwashed, kale will keep in the refrigerator for about a week. To freeze, blanch and store in airtight plastic bags.

Recette

SPAGHETTI WITH KALE, GARLIC AND OIL

Ingredients

  • Kosher salt
  • 3 large or 4 small bunches kale, any type (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 12 oz. spaghetti, thick spaghetti, bucatini, or other long strand pasta
  • Parmesan cheese flakes and red pepper flakes (for serving)
  • flaky sea salt

Preparation

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, strip kale leaves from ribs and stems, then tear leaves crosswise into 2″–3″ pieces. Cook kale in boiling water until bright green and slightly softened, about 2 minutes. Using tongs, transfer kale to a colander and rinse under cold water, tossing; squeeze out excess liquid from leaves. Keep water at a boil (you’ll use it for the pasta).
  2. Whack garlic with the side of a chef’s knife to crush; peel off skins. Heat ¼ cup oil in a large heavy pot over medium. Cook garlic, stirring occasionally, until sizzling, about 3 minutes. Season very generously with black pepper and cook, smashing with a wooden spoon, until cloves break into rough pieces, soften, and look golden.
  3. Add kale to pot and cook, stirring often, until darkened in color and very tender, about 8 minutes (garlic will break into even smaller pieces). Season with kosher salt and pepper.
  4. Meanwhile, cook pasta, stirring occasionally, until very al dente (2–3 minutes less than package directions).
  5. Using tongs, add pasta to kale; splash in about 1 cup pasta cooking liquid. Cook, tossing and adding more pasta cooking liquid as needed, until sauce lightly coats pasta, about 2 minutes.
  6. Serve pasta topped with Parmesan, red pepper flakes, sea salt, and more black pepper.

Source

site Bon Appétit

Fragaria x ananassa ‘Berri Basket’ (F1 Hot Pink)

Description
‘Berri basket Rose’ Strawberries produce pink flowers before fruiting. The fruit is smaller and sweeter than most large strawberries found in the grocery store. The plant remains low and bushy and produces fruit throughout the summer months. This variety is great to grow along raised borders or in pots.

Nutrients
Strawberries are a great source of vitamin C and potassium. They are rich in fiber, foliate and anti-oxidants.

How to Select
Choose berries that are soft and deeply coloured. Avoid eating berries which have holes and may contain worms.

When and How to Pick
Please pick a maximum of 10% of the fruit at one time. Pull the berry gently from the stem. Avoid pulling the leaves and plants to assure the survival of the plant.

How to prepare
Strawberries can be eaten raw or cooked. They make a delicious addition to smoothies and are excellent in jams. Strawberries can be frozen whole or crushed.

Recipe

STRAWBERRY-BEET SMOOTHIE

Ingredients

    • 1/2 cup roasted beets
    • 2 cups strawberries
    • 1 cup plain whole-milk yoghurt
    • 2 tablespoons raw honey
    • 1 banana
    • 1/2 cup orange juice

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 °F (190 °C).
  2. Trim the tops and tails off the beets and cut in half.
  3. Drizzle beets with olive oil and cover with the remaining foil.
  4. Bake for about an hour or until beets are soft when pierced with a fork. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. Once cool, peel off the skins.
  5. In a storage bag combine beets and ½ cup orange juice. Store marinated beets in the fridge for up to a week.
  6. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.

Source

website: livesimply.me

Fragaria x ananassa ‘Berri Basket’ (F1 Hot Pink)

Description
The ‘Medusa’ pepper is a type of sweet, ornamental chilli pepper that grows upright, brightly-coloured fruit. The long and thin peppers produce a “hair of snakes” suggestive of the gorgon Medusa in Greek mythology.

** Even though Medusa peppers are considered a sweet chilli, caution should be taken when picking and eating these peppers as toldernce differs from person to person. Make sure you wash your hands well with soap after picking and preparing for cooking. Oils can travel from your hands to your eyes or other sensitive areas causing irritation. If you should get pepper in your eyes, please call your doctor for advice.

Nutrients
Peppers are low in sodium and very low in saturated fat and cholesterol. They also a good source of dietary fiber, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and copper, and a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6, potassium and manganese.

How to Select
Choose peppers that are vibrant colour, have growth lines and come off the plant when tugged lightly.

When and How to Pick
When finished growing, peppers will pull off the plant very easily. If they remain attached, they are still growing. Sometimes tiny brown lines will form on the peppers; these are growth lines and indicate the pepper is mature. If these lines are forming, you can pick the pepper, regardless of size. If for any reason a pepper is picked before it is ripe, it can be placed on a south-facing windowsill until it ripens.

Preparation
The peppers can be added to many savoury dishes or used in pickling. Use caution when handling. Even though these are considered mild peppers, everyone’s taste differs. Make sure to thoroughly wash hands with soap after touching and avoid contact with eyes.

Recette

RED PEPPER AND CHILLI CHUTNEY

Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 1 hour, 30 minutes
Yield: 3 small jars

Ingredients

  • 500g sweet red pepper
  • -4 fresh red chillies or red jalapeno (reduce the amount if you prefer less spicy)
  • 2 large cooking apples
  • 2 large red onions, finely chopped
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons ginger-garlic paste
  • 10 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 200g brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 tablespoon Kashmiri chilli powder (optional)
  • pinch red chilli flakes, dried

Preparation

  1. Have a few small sterililized jars ready.
  2. Heat oil in a pan, add chopped onion, cook very slowly for about 15-20 minutes or until the onion becomes sticky.
  3. Meanwhile, finely chop peppers, chillies, tomatoes and apples or use a food processor (do not puree).
  4. Add all the chopped ingredients, ginger-garlic puree, sugar and vinegar. Mix and keep stirring. Let it cook on a very low heat.
  5. As the liquid reduces, the mixture will become thick and sticky. It will take about 40-45 minutes.
  6. Switch off the heat and spoon in into sterile jars. Store in a cool, dark place.
  7. Once opened, refrigerate and use within 2 weeks.

Source

Jagruti’s Cooking Odyssey

HÔTEL DE VILLE DE WESTMOUNT
(corner Côte-St-Antoine Rd. and Stanton St.)

Beet ‘Bull’s Blood’
Swiss chard ‘Bright Lights’
Kale ‘Toscano’

WESTMOUNT RECREATION CENTRE
(green roof next to the café)

Beet ‘Bull’s Blood’
Swiss chard ‘Bright Lights’
Swiss chard ‘Bali’
Kale ‘Toscano’
Strawberry ‘Berri Basket’

Sunflower
Ground cherry
Herbs – sage, tarragon, chives parsley, oregano

HARVESTING - SUMMER AND AUTUMN

Members of the public are invited to use the edible plants, but are asked to harvest no more than 10% of any vegetables or fruit at a given time and to use care to avoid damaging or pulling out the plants (where possible, bring scissors). This will ensure a continued production of leaves and fruit throughout the season, and will help the plant displays look attractive and full throughout the summer.

At the end of the growing season, the flowers are turned into compost and given away to residents free of charge during the seasonal compost distribution. The remaining vegetables and fruits are picked by volunteers and donated to the Depot Community Food Centre in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce.

INCREDIBLE EDIBLES : THE INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENT

The Incredible Edible project – now a global movement – began as an urban gardening project in 2008 by a group of residents in Todmorden, U.K., population 15,000. The project aims to bring people together through actions around local food, helping to change behaviour towards the environment and to build a kinder and more resilient world. In many places, it also envisions making towns and cities more self-sufficient in food production and lead the way to a healthier, more sustainable and more inclusive local food system.

 

These initiatives can take many forms – vegetable gardens, street planters, food forests, edible restaurant terraces, and more – and are usually planted and maintained by volunteer citizens. In only a few years, this single experiment in local self-sufficiency has been taken up by communities all over the world and there are now 120 official IE groups in the UK and more than 700 worldwide.

People around the world are adapting and benefitting from this new way of urban living by creating gardens and producing food in urban spaces that might otherwise be unused. Beyond encouraging local food, creative and collective action for the common good is truly at the heart of the Incredible Edible idea.

(source : Wikipedia and Incredible Edible Todmorden)

Learn more about the movement and consult the world map of IE initiatives:
Incredible Edible Todmorden.

URBAN FRUIT GLEANING AND FRUIT SHARING

Fruit gleaning – the harvest of leftover or unwanted crops – is gaining popularity in cities around the world. In Montreal, several urban agriculture and meals on wheels groups organize teams of pickers to harvest fruit from public or private trees that would otherwise be unused. The fresh fruit is then shared between tree owners, pickers, food banks, shelters and community kitchens. It reduces food waste and benefits the community.

If you have a tree with fruit to share, or if you are looking to join a team and help harvest fruit, you can find a group to collaborate with by searching online. There are also a few websites with mapping tools where you can donate or swap fruit, or find others that wish to share their harvest.

We encourage anyone wanting to learn more about fruit collection or about joining a group to find more information online by using the following key words in their search: urban fruit harvest, gleaning, fruit rescue, city fruit, harvest sharing, surplus fruit, etc.